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One of the largest Baroque palaces in Germany

Ludwigsburg Residential Palace

Teil des Registraturzimmers König Friedrichs I. im Residenzschloss Ludwigsburg; Foto: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Arnim Weischer
Royal splendor in the Antique style

The king's

apartment

The Classical decor used in King Friedrich I von Württemberg's apartment in the new central building is a masterpiece created by architect Nikolaus Friedrich von Thouret. King Friedrich used the representative rooms during his summer stays in Ludwigsburg.

King Friedrich I's audience chamber at Ludwigsburg Residential Palace. Image: Landesmedienzentrum Baden-Württemberg, Dieter Jäger

The royal throne in the audience chamber.

The royal audience chamber

The royal throne and its stately canopy of red velvet sits at the top of a three-steps platform at the center of the audience chamber as a symbol of the new royal dignity. The luxurious material covering the chair is older and is likely from the Zwiefalten Monastery, expropriated and given to Württemberg in 1802. When creating the monumental furniture and the room's decor, royal architect Nikolaus Friedrich von Thouret was inspired by ancient Egyptian artwork, which was rediscovered during Napoleon's campaign along the Nile.

King Friedrich I's bedroom at Ludwigsburg Residential Palace. Image: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Steffen Hauswirth

King Friedrich I's bedroom.

Prayers under a pavilion roof

The elegant light blue silk drapes in King Friedrich I's bedroom give it the appearance of a tent. The preserved original cloth was originally turquoise. The ruler's impressive physical size becomes apparent when looking at his giant bed from 1811. The king was demanding in the selection of this furniture. The delicate bronze-adorned mahogany furniture was created by the famous cabinet maker, David Roentgen, and his student, Johannes Klinckerfuß.

Visitors at Ludwigsburg Residential Palace. Image: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Niels Schubert

A royal presence in every room.

Rooms for the business of state

Starting in 1803, architect Thouret decorated the royal assembly room in two dominant colors: yellow and blue. The ruler's virtues, painted on a dark blue background and based on Antique examples, create a harmonious contrast to the yellow silk damask wall coverings. Antique and Renaissance artwork also inspired the wall and ceiling decor in the records room. This is where the king stored his files in special file cabinets.

Registraturzimmer König Friedrichs I. im Residenzschloss Ludwigsburg; Foto: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Steffen Hauswirth
Konferenzzimmer König Friedrichs I. im Residenzschloss Ludwigsburg; Foto: Landesmedienzentrum Baden-Württemberg, Dieter Jäger

References to antique art are made throughout King Friedrich I's apartment.